World Championship News Flash

by Steve Gardner

I am very proud to have been at this year’s World Championships at big Frank Ciavattones in Boston it was a great competition and the British lifters were just brilliant. In the ladies event I am so chuffed that Karen and Paula from my own club both took World titles in their weight classes and both won outstanding lifter awards in their age divisions.  Paula at 40 plus and Karen at 50 plus and finished first and second in the overall rankings..well done ladies! George Dick was super at 125 plus taking 65 plus title and outstanding lifter at 65 plus also. Steve Sherwood was out of this World winning has weight class and outstanding lifter in his age division and winning the overall champion of champions title case best lifter at the championship by a huge margin over very strong challenges from Chad Ullam and Al Myers and James Fuller. All of the lifters did great and Frank C put on a superb competition. Chris Bass was great helping me at the score table and the evening finished off with two award of merit presentations, the IAWA highest award. I was proud to present the award to Frank Allen and Al Myers presented to Frank Ciavattone two great awards, a perfect end to a perfect championships. Looking forward to getting things sorted now for the Gold Cup….long live Iawa!

Congrats to Paula!

by Al Myers

Paula DeLaMata receiving her Sports Scholarship Award for her outstanding weight lifting accomplishments in 2012.

I always like to see lifters get recognition by their local community for their personal accomplishments.  Recently, Paula DeLaMata was awarded the Sports Scholarship Award for her All-Round Weightlifting accomplishments for the year 2012.  This award was given to her on March 21st in East Staffordshire, England.  Anyone who has been involved at all in IAWA knows Paula. Her vibrant  and extremely outgoing personality makes her an “instant hit” at All Round meets.  This, combined with her outstanding lifting, makes her STAND OUT to all the other lifters. She won her class at the  2012 IAWA World All Round Championships last fall in Salina, Kansas.

The local newspaper featured Paula!

This exert came from a local paper, “The evening saw the Burton Albion Football Club Sports Personality of the Year awarded to weightlifter Paula DeLaMata .  Paula has had an amazing year in her sport, winning several major honors, including the IAWA 2012 Open World Championships which were held in Kansas in October.  Paula aims for this year are to defend her world title and maintain her position representing IAWA(UK) in International Competition.”

Congratulations Paula! I think I can speak on behalf of the entire IAWA membership when I say this, WE ARE PROUD OF YOU!

IAWA Flags

by Al Myers

IAWA Banner

A while back on the IAWA(UK) Facebook page Steve Gardner posed this question to the membership, “How many countries have been represented in IAWA competitions over the past 25 years?”  This may include just 1 lifter from any given country.  Several responses were given to fully answer this question.  The final count came to 15 NATIONS that have sent at least one representative to an IAWA event or competition!

Steve then put together this banner which shows the flags of all countries that have had past involvement in IAWA.  Can you identify all the flags?  I had to “cheat” and look a few up – but here are the answers!

United Kingdom Germany New Zealand China
Canada Ireland Finland Italy
Thailand Australia Pakistan Spain
Wales United States Scotland England

Presidential Speech

by Al Myers, IAWA President

Another year is underway in the World of All Round Weightlifting and the IAWA.   Our history has been a rich one over the past 25 years in IAWA.  I feel the time is here that I should make my “presidential speech” – since being elected the IAWA President last October at the AGM of IAWA.  I know this is an expected duty of any incoming President -  but  I am doing this with some reservations, as I feel that we “have a good thing going” and BIG major changes are not really needed in our organization.   This is due to the previous administration, especially under the guidance of Past IAWA President Steve Gardner.  Steve has lead IAWA in excellent fashion over his two 4-year terms as IAWA President.   I am only hoping that I will be able to “follow in his footsteps” with the same enthusiasm and passion that he has shown for IAWA.   One thing that has always impressed me with Steve is his belief in the democratic principle within the organization, which I wholeheartedly agree with.   IAWA is a democratic body, and in turn should represent the majority viewpoints of the membership.   I promise that I will do my best to represent the feelings of those that elected me, even if my feelings are different on issues.   I’m your elected representative and it’s my duty to represent your views.  Please contact me with your concerns if you have them.  I am “very open” to hearing from the membership and encouraging discussions to solve problem issues.

 The International All Round Weightlifting Association (IAWA)  is the “umbrella World organization” of three Nations that contain organized All Round Weightlifting associations – the USAWA, the IAWA(UK), and the ARWLWA.   I feel the primary purpose of IAWA is to provide the guidance to allow all three organizations to come together for annual World competitions, ie The IAWA World Championships, the Gold Cup, and the IAWA World Postal Meet.    As President, I will make sure to represent all Nations involved.   I also recognize that we are not all “mirror images” of each other, and that is a good thing.  The USAWA has distinctive qualities to it that are different than the IAWA(UK), while the ARWLWA has it’s own very unique “flavor” to their organization.  We are all different in many ways.  History and membership viewpoints are what have driven this, and thus each organization is providing what is wanted by those directly involved.   That’s why I’m saying these differences are a good thing and should be emphasized and commended, instead of criticized and condemned.  However, there are ever-constant problems  in “coming together” for World events when ideas are different.  There has to be some “give and take” to work out these issues – and that is the primary purpose of IAWA – not to supersede established traditions within a nations governing body. 

I do feel that the relations are at an “ALL TIME HIGH” between the USAWA, the IAWA(UK), and the ARWLWA.  This has been shown over the last couple of World Championships.  Again, much of this is attributed to the work of Steve and his ability to promote unity and work through difficulties diplomatically.  He has that gift of leadership.  I will continually “lean on him” for advice in any major IAWA decision made or influenced by myself, as well as the elected board of officers and the IAWA Technical Committee.   The positive relations have also been enhanced by the available networking medias now-a-days.   The USAWA, IAWA-UK, and the ARWLWA each have active Facebook pages to facilitate communications between not only their membership, but others as well.  Practically every day I have contact with someone overseas, either via facebook, message boards,  or email. 

Ok – up till now it seems like I’m just being “general” with all this talk.  I’m sounding like a Politician just throwing out “feel good” concepts that are not specific in any way.  Well, let me give a couple “specific” ideas that I would like to see get accomplished during my next four years in office. 

Develop for the first time a IAWA Rulebook

Up till now there has not really been an IAWA Rulebook.  Each organization has followed their own rulebook which has left many rules of IAWA “unwritten”.   Examples of this is that there are NO WRITTEN rules outlining the proper approval presentation of lifts, the rules of government for  the World Championships and the Gold Cup,  rules for the IAWA Drug Testing Policy, etc.  I could go “on and on” about this as these “unwritten rules” apply to MAJOR ISSUES, which are WAY BEYOND individual lift rules which are only MINOR in comparison. 

Encourage and recruit at least one more “member Nation” to IAWA

Though the years IAWA has had many lifters from countries outside of the United States, the UK, and Australia compete in the Worlds or Gold Cup.  However, as I stated earlier, these other Nations do not have organized All Round Associations consisting of bylaws, Rules, and sanctioned competitions – and these lifters have competed in IAWA events on their own.   I would like to see other Nations “step up” and form All Round Weightlifting organizations that would join IAWA to strengthen and expand our organization.  I will make it a goal of mine to help facilitate this, and provide any guidance that is needed to accomplish this.

Develop historical archives for IAWA

I have already done some of this which is available on the USAWA website under the “history” section.  However, I would like to see our history preserved beyond what I have already done.  I hate to see the past history of the organization “lost” as time goes by.  We have to remember where we came from, as that defines who we are now.  There are VERY FEW around anymore that have been with IAWA since the beginning and know this history firsthand.  I think it is important that the younger lifters have somewhere to look to find out more about the history of our organization.

We may not be a huge organization that has thousands of members – but we are a “close knit” group.  I would contend that having a large membership with hundreds of lifters at the World Championships may NOT be a good thing.   Right now we all know each other and when we get together at meets it is like seeing your family members at a family reunion.  The camaraderie between competitors is strong –something you do not see in other lifting sports.  Little things like that would be lost with a large membership.  We presently have a great IAWA World Record data base – with thanks owed to Chris Bass for this, and before him, to Frank Allen.  The drug testing at IAWA events has been upheld to the ethics of the organization.  We state that we are a drug-free organization and we do the testing to prove it.  That’s something to be proud of.  We have been diligent in promoting our events.  Not once since the World Championships or Gold Cup has started has these events not been contested on a yearly basis.  The annual promotions of these events are vital to the future of IAWA, as they are the basis of our yearly success.   Included in this is the IAWA Annual General Meeting – which allows the membership to speak their concerns and voting to be taken place to uphold the democratic principles of the IAWA.  The AGM is held every year without fail.  Under my term, I promise to keep these events held faithfully on an annual basis.

Like I said earlier – the IAWA has had a rich history of success.  Despite a few “up and downs” and doubters through the years, the organization has not only survived but has thrived.  At the past IAWA World Championships last fall we celebrated the 25 year anniversary of IAWA.  Let’s make the NEXT 25 years just as good as the first 25 years!

Gold Cup Reminder

by Steve Gardner

HAVE YOU GOT YOUR ENTRY IN YET FOR THE GOLD CUP  WORLD RECORD BREAKERS EVENT: Saturday 1st October?

The second biggest Annual International Event in All Round Weightlifting, and remember…… this year sees the option of lifting for the Silver Cup, for those not able to attempt a World Record at the moment, but going for National or Club records or even PB’s. This will be a classic event and the Hall of Fame Induction will also take place at the Banquet Dinner .. for more details contact:

Steve Gardner 01283 713464
steve-g@powerful.co.uk

DONT DELAY – DO IT TODAY!!

Andy Goddard Postal

by Steve Gardner

MEET ANNOUNCEMENT

Andy Goddard Tribute Postal Competition 2011

The Andy Goddard Tribute competition this year will be on two different lifts: (Alt Grip Bench Press – Straddle Deadlift) but still based around the Bench Press – Deadlift theme (they were Andy’s favourite lifts).  As last year, this competition will be open to all and everyone who wants their name and results to be listed in Andy’s memory.  Lifters can be listed in the official IAWA members record claim set of results, or in the listings for those not current members who just want to take part.

BUT…

1) All results must be sent in to Steve Gardner (steve-g@powerful.co.uk) by the END OF MARCH

2) All results must be clearly recorded to show if the lifter is

a) a current IAWA member or not, and

b) If the lifts were performed before 2 or 3 referees (which will be good for record claims) or

c) If the lifts were performed before just one referee which will be acceptable for the competition (but not record claims)

Good luck and lets get lifting in Andy’s memory!

World Postal Challenge

by Al Myers

RESULTS of the 2010 IAWA

WORLD POSTAL TEAM CHALLENGE

Scott Tully, of the Dino Gym, posted the highest Individual Total in the IAWA World Team Postal Challenge in helping the Dino Gym to a first place finish.

The 2010 World Team Postal Challenge was a huge success.  Ten teams entered the competition, which consisted of  each team providing three lifters whose scores were added together for a team point total.  The USA had 5 teams, England had 4 teams, and Scotland provided 1 team.  This competition is one of three major IAWA events (the World Championships and the Gold Cup being the other two) held each year.  The credit for this competition needs to go to our IAWA President Steve Gardner for organizing it and compiling the results.  Without Steve’s commitment to the IAWA, we wouldn’t have the opportunities we have and the IAWA wouldn’t be near as strong as it is.  We need to give him the thanks he deserves – often the leadership he provides us does not get enough recognition.  Thank you Steve for everything you do on behalf of the IAWA!!

RESULTS

Meet Director:  Steve Gardner

Officials:  three certified officials were used on all lifts

Lifts:  Snatch – One Arm, Pinch Grip – 2 hands, Bench Press – Feet in Air, Deadlift – Ciavattone Grip

1.  Dino Gym 1 (USA) – 1112.1 points

Lifter Age BWT Snatch Pinch Bench Dead Total Points
A Myers 44 115.7 72.6 R 62.2 154.3 200 489.1 403.3
C Ullom 38 108.4 68.1 R 57.6 120.2 210 456.0 370.2
S Tully 34 156.1 52.2 R 75.8 167.9 200 495.9 338.6

2.  Powerhouse 1 (England) – 1039.4 points

Lifter Age BWT Snatch Pinch Bench Dead Total Points
M Price 45 97.1 47.5 R 50 155 140 392.5 358.0
J Gardner 26 89.8 52.5 R 65 105 180 402.5 361.7
S Gardner 53 129.7 37.5 R 60 110 170 377.5 319.6

3.  Ambridge VFW (USA) – 1034.8 points

Lifter Age BWT Snatch Pinch Bench Dead Total Points
A Montini 83 81.8 18.2 L 25.4 54.4 102 200 307.3
J McKean 64 74.8 24.9 R 45.9 58.9 146 275.7 345.2
S Schmidt 57 114.3 50 R 70 105 185 410 382.3

4.  Dino Gym 2 (USA) – 975.1 points

Lifter Age BWT Snatch Pinch Bench Dead Total Points
C Cookson 40 124.8 59.0 R 57.6 127.0 210 453.6 346.6
D Barnhart 43 131.6 43.1 R 75.8 136.1 200 455.1 349.0
R Bletscher 74 98.9 20.4 R 44.0 50.0 113.4 227.8 279.5

5.  Willies Warriors (Scotland) – 973.8 points

Lifter Age BWT Snatch Pinch Bench Dead Total Points
A Tomlin 43 94.8 47.5 R 55 95 170 367.5 333.2
C Ross 26 92.7 50 L 65 105 160 380.0 335.2
G Dick 61 130.0 42.5 R 40 105 150 337.5 305.4

6.  Granby Grippers (England) – 968.1 points

Lifter Age BWT Snatch Pinch Bench Dead Total Points
D Andrews 14 58.8 22.5 R 29.5 37.5 75 164.5 232.8
S Andrews 51 70.5 50 R 49.5 85 130 314.5 366.4
F Allen 68 89.1 35 R 39.5 85 150 309.5 368.9

7.  Habeckers Gym (USA)  -  917.1 points

Lifter Age BWT Snatch Pinch Bench Dead Total Points
D Habecker 67 86.0 30 R 50 92.5 140 312.5 371.3
K Hess 16 136.0 40 R 87.7 80 145 352.7 281.7
A Hess 46 140.6 35 R 87.7 82.5 140 345 264.1

8.  Powerhouse 2 (England) -  877.9 points

Lifter Age BWT Snatch Pinch Bench Dead Total Points
G Saxton 48 113.6 37.5 R 55 115 160 367.5 317.5
W Smith 18 134.3 45 R 67.5 125 170 407.5 306.5
K Gardner 51 73.2 15 R 40 32.5 85 172.5 253.9

9.  Tiverton WL Club (England) – 701.1 points

Lifter Age BWT Snatch Pinch Bench Dead Total Points
G Ell 39 85.0 42.5 L 46.4 127.5 170 386.4 358.3
M Rattenbury 48 65.0 27.5 L 33.9 85 140 286.4 342.8

10.   Frank’s Gym (USA)  – 598.2 points

Lifter Age BWT Snatch Pinch Bench Dead Total Points
F Ciavattone 55 125.0 40 R 77.5 115 215 447.5 392.4
F Ciavattone Jr 16 108.0 25 R 40 50 115 230 205.8

NOTES:  BWT is bodyweight in kilograms.  All lifts are in kilograms.  Points are adjusted for bodyweight and age.

World Postal – Individual Ranking List

1.    403.3  Al Myers
2.    392.4  Frank Ciavattone
3.    382.3  Scott Schmidt
4.    371.3  Denny Habecker
5.    370.2  Chad Ullom
6.    368.9  Frank Allen
7.    366.4  Steve Andrews
8.    361.7  James Gardner
9.    358.3  Gary Ell
10.  358.0  Mark Price
11.  349.0  Darren Barnhart
12.  346.6  Chuck Cookson
13.  345.2  John McKean
14.  342.8  Mark Rattenbury
15.  338.6  Scott Tully
16.  335.2  Chris Ross
17.  333.2  Andy Tomlin
18.  319.6  Steve Gardner
19.  317.5  Graham Saxton
20.  307.3  Art Montini
21.  306.5  Wade Smith
22.  305.4  George Dick
23.  281.7  Kohl Hess
24.  279.5  Rudy Bletscher
25.  264.1  Andrew Hess
26.  253.9  Karen Gardner
27.  232.8  Daniel Andrews
28.  205.8  Frank Ciavattone Jr.

Team Match Winners – Top 5

1.   Dino Gym 1 – USA

2.   Powerhouse Gym 1 – England

3.   Ambridge VFW – USA

4.   Dino Gym 2 – USA

5.   Willies Warriors – Scotland

Overall Best Lifters – Top 5

1.   Al Myers – USA

2.   Frank Ciavattone – USA

3.   Scott Schmidt  – USA

4.   Denny Habecker – USA

5.   Chad Ullom – USA

Best Ladies Lifter

Karen Gardner – England

Best Junior Lifter

Wade Smith – England

Best Open Lifter

Chad Ullom – USA

Best Masters Lifter

Al Myers – USA

World Title Winners listed by Class and Age Divisions

LADIES

Karen Gardner – 50+75 kilo class winner

JUNIORS

Daniel Andrews – 14/15 yrs 60 kilo class winner
Kohl Hess – 16/17 yrs 125+ kilo class winner
Frankie Ciavattone – 16/17 yrs 110 kilo class winner
Wade Smith – 18/19 yrs 125+ kilo class winner

OPEN DIVISION

Gary Ell – Mens 85 kilo class winner
James Gardner – Mens 90 kilo class winner
Chris Ross – Mens 95 kilo class winner
Chad Ullom – Mens 110 kilo class winner
Scott Tully – Mens 125+ kilo class winner

MASTERS 40+

Andy Tomlin – Mens 95 kilo class winner
Al Myers – Mens 120 kilo class winner
Chuck Cookson – Mens 125 kilo class winner
Darren Barnhart – Mens 125+ kilo class winner

MASTERS 45+

Mark Rattenbury – Mens 65 kilo class winner
Mark Price – Mens 110 kilo class winner
Graham Saxton – Mens 115 kilo class winner
Andrew Hess – Mens 125+ kilo class winner

MASTERS 50+

Steve Andrews – Mens 75 kilo class winner
Steve Gardner – Mens 125+ kilo class winner

MASTERS 55+

Scott Schmidt – Mens 115 kilo class winner
Frank Ciavattone – Mens 125 kilo class winner

MASTERS 60+

John McKean – Mens 75 kilo class winner
George Dick – Mens 125+ kilo class winner

MASTERS 65+

Denny Habecker – Mens 90 kilo class winner
Frank Allen – Mens 90 kilo class runner up

MASTERS 70+

Rudy Bletscher – Mens 100 kilo class winner

MASTERS 80+

Art Montini – Mens 85 kilo class winner

2012 IAWA Worlds to be held in Kansas City

by Al Myers

Chad Ullom and Al Myers will be the Meet Promoters for the 2012 IAWA All-Round Weightlifting World Championships.

Another thing that arose from the 2010 IAWA World Council Meeting was that Chad Ullom and myself submitted a bid to host the 2012 IAWA World Championships – and it was ACCEPTED!!   Chad and I will be co-promoters (meaning that we will SHARE in the expenses!).  We plan to have the Championships the first weekend of October,  which is the traditional date for it.  It will be held in Kansas City, which has a major airport to allow for lifters to fly into the meet without much additional travel.   We have not selected a venue yet.  We are excited about this opportunity and plan to host it in a “FIRST RATE STYLE”.   This location (Kansas City)  is the “center point” of All-Round weightlifting in the United States, and hopefully, will stimulate a big interest in attendance. This is the first time the IAWA World Championships will be held in Kansas.   The entry forms will not be available until after next year’s Championships, but I wanted to announce the date now so everyone will have plenty of time to get this date on their schedule.

Art Montini is presented the IAWA Award of Merit

by Al Myers

Art Montini (center picture) receiving the IAWA Award of Merit. To left is the 2010 IAWA World Championships Meet Promoter George Dick, and to the right is IAWA President Steve Gardner.

One of the HIGHLIGHTS of the 2010 IAWA World Championships in Glasgow, Scotland was when Art Montini was presented the IAWA Award of Merit, a Presidential Award  presented to Art  by our IAWA President Steve Gardner.  This is the FIRST EVER such award ever given on behalf of the IAWA, and it went to the best eligible candidate in the organization.  Art has been to MOST of the IAWA World Championships since the IAWA was formed, and he ALWAYS represents himself in a dignified, professional manner that epitomizes the character of a CHAMPIONSHIP ATHLETE.  Art competes like he is working a job, always focused and performing picture-perfect lifts like they’re just another “task at hand”.  Don’t let his casual demeanor mislead you when he’s lifting – internally he’s as fired up as anyone else!!!

Another thing that impresses me immensely about Art is the passion he still has for lifting.  Art is now 82 years old, but when you are around him it becomes obvious that he “feels” like a much younger man.  I hope that I will have the same zeal for lifting that he has when I’m his age.  He is a great inspiration to me and I’m sure to many others.  He had no idea that he was going to be presented this award, and even when Steve was giving his intro, Art still didn’t think it was about him.  I was sitting right across from him at the banquet and the look of amazement and acknowledgment upon hearing his name called was PRICELESS!!

This is for Art – every0ne in the USAWA and IAWA consider you our  “father figure” in our organization who we look up to.  We are EXTREMELY PROUD that you have received this AWARD OF MERIT!!!! Congratulations!!

A Lift for Andy

Tribute to Andy Goddard

by Steve Gardner

Andy Goddard performing one of his favorite lifts - the Bench Press

It will be a year on March 26th since I said goodbye to my friend Andy. The Gym has not been the same without him, but we carry on with Andy always in our thoughts.

I have decided to run a postal competition as a tribute to Andy Goddard. The lifts will be simple and contain two of his favorites: the Bench Press and the Two Hands Deadlift.

I am inviting friends of Andys, and all IAWA members in general, to take part in this ‘Tribute Lift for Andy’. Lifts are to be completed by the end of March. One referee will be ok for the tribute lifts, but if you want the lifts to be considered for record purposes they must be clearly marked as refereed by two officials.

Remember – it doesn’t matter how much you lift or whether you are not fully training or injured. Just submit token results if you can’t do more, just to be a part of our ‘Tribute to Andy’.

There will be an Andy Goddard Trophy kept at the Powerhouse Gym and the overall Winners name will go on that trophy!

World Team Postal Competition

World Team Postal Competition
“IAWA World Open Team All Round Weightlifting Challenge 2010″

USAWA President Denny Habecker and IAWA President Steve Gardner at the 2009 IAWA World Championships.

by Al Myers

Our IAWA President Steve Gardner has just released the details of the World Team Postal Competition. Last year it was a great success – with 10 teams and 33 individuals entering! Steve has picked new lifts for this years competition. The lifts this year are – One Arm Barbell Snatch, Two Hands Pinch Grip, Feet in the Air Bench Press, and the Ciavattone Grip Deadlift. I always felt one of the reasons lifters lost interest in the prior World Postal Championships (before it was hosted by Steve Gardner) was because the same lifts were contested year after year. However, I competed in it every year to show my support. But one of the main things that attracted me to the All Rounds was the variety of lifts and I was starting to get bored with this meet because it was the same meet year after year. So I’m glad to see Steve “mixing things up” with the lifts in this new World Postal Meet. It also changes the dynamics of the meet – because different lifters are stronger in different lifts. When the same lifts are done every year, the same lifters win every year. Changing the lifts every year will enhance the excitement of the outcome of this World Postal Championships!

There is no entry fee for this meet. Everything is done over email and the website, with practically no expenses incurred. Another problem with the prior World Postal Meet was the expense of sending everything through the postal service, and the money spent on medals and plaques for the winners. There was never enough income through entry fees to offset the expense of hosting it. Steve sends nice certificates to the winners via email, allowing the recipients to print them out if they wish at their own expense. This is a great opportunity to compete in a “World Meet” without ever leaving the confines of your own gym. Steve has done a great job putting this meet together, and has organized it in a way that should have continual success. One thing I want to point out is this is an IAWA competition – thus THREE OFFICIALS are required instead of one. These officials must be Certified USAWA Officials. The information page and the entry form for this meet are available on the Website Event Calendar. Steve has given plenty of notice on this meet – so put the dates on your calendar, organize your team, and get ready to TAKE ON THE WORLD!

World Team Postal

by Steve Gardner, IAWA President

Meet Announcement

World Team Postal 2010

I have announced plans for the World Team Postal Event, and following on last years success hopes to increase the numbers taking part this year.  REMEMBER: Although it is a Team Postal, Individual Lifters can still post their totals for inclusion in the World Postal Rankings! Lifts to be completed by End of September.  Entry forms will go out in the July Journal (or Download Entry Form).

Lifts:

Snatch – One Arm

Pinch Grip – Two Hands

Bench Press – Feet in Air

Deadlift – Ciavattone Grip

Following the success of the 2009 Team Postal event (33 lifters and ten teams took part) I am going to try and double this years participation. In 2009 we had teams from Australia, USA, and England, and this year we hope to build on that, this year already Spain have asked to take part!  I will distribute score sheets via the various Newsletters and Journals. The lifts will be: The One Hand Barbell Snatch (indicate which hand used), The Two Hands Pinch Grip Lift, The Bench Press Feet in the Air, The Ciavattone Deadlift. The tournament is being run as a team match where teams will consist of three lifters, they may be Juniors, Open Lifters, Masters or Ladies or any combination of the afore mentioned, as all lifters results will be age and body weight amended etc. The lifts can be performed any time in 2010 BEFORE the end of September. The lifts must be performed before at least two IAWA Officials, who MUST also sign the score sheet. The competition will be run as a usual IAWA event with a rising bar. Teams or Groups can enter any number of lifters into the competition, and the top three amended scores will formulate a first team etc. Any individual members left will still have their totals configured into the results which will also be produced to give individual rankings on all lifts and totals, and all divisions and body weights.Lifters who are not members of a group, team or club can still submit their results so long as they can get their lifts officiated, and all results will form the rankings as described in the above paragraph.The score sheets should be completed using kilos where possible, but the organiser will convert pounds to kilos if needs be, BUT please make sure all sheets are completed accurately and legibly. You will notice there are four boxes per lift to correspond with 4 attempts per lift if required, the best lift of the 4 should be circled.If lifters require certificates, please affix an e mail address in the appropriate box on the score sheet, and these will be submitted by e mail for you to print off. The score sheet can be copied off as many times as you wish to submit as many teams or lifters as you wish. There is no fee attached to this competition. There are five lines on a score sheet to accommodate a team of three plus two others, if there are six lifters, use two score sheets with one team on each etc. When the lifts are completed please submit without delay:

Entry Form – PostalEntryForm

Steve Gardner – 18 Holly Road, Barton, Staffs. England DE13 8LP or by E Mail to: steve-g@powerful.co.uk

IAWA Gold Cup

The 2009 IAWA Gold Cup – A Great Success!

by Steve Gardner

2009 IAWA Gold Cup Group Picture

There were 25 lifters taking part in this years Gold Cup World Record Breakers Tournament, which was held in Glasgow, Scotland. All of the hard work and effort put in by this years promoter David McFadzean and his support team at the Castlemilk Gym Club, was repaid in fine style as the 2009 event was a great success. The list of impressive records that were broken and set was of a very high standard, with several new lifters taking part and giving a good account of themselves too! A big welcome into the IAWA family goes out to: The Hughes trio, sister and brothers, Nicola, Robbie and Chris, and also to Alan Higgs and Tom Moffat, they all lifted well. It was nice to see Frank Allen back in action, and also Steve Angell on impressive form. People were pleased to see Karen Gardner perform her first lifting since her Cancer operation a year ago, and Agnes Mcinally who is slowly returning to form after her problems too, Agnes says she has found a new incentive in the sport: helping to coach new lifter Nicola Hughes. Denny Habecker from the USA never fails to delight us on the platform, and he too is recently back from a hip operation. Mark Haydock lifted the heaviest ever trap bar deadlift at 323.5 kilos much to the delight of a heavily pregnant Mrs Haydock (soon to deliver). All in all it was a really nice day, a good competition in a great atmosphere. Well done again to David and his team on a job well done!

FULL MEET RESULTS:

IAWA Gold Cup 2009

Castlemilk, Glasgow, Scotland.       Saturday 7th November

Promoter: David McFadzean (assisted by members of the Castlemilk Gym)

Lifter                                      Class   Div      Lifts

Steve Gardner                         125+    M50+    R/H Ring Finger Lift  80k – L/H Index Finger Lift  75k

Frank Allen                              90        M65+    Pullover at arms Length  45k

David McFadzean                     100      Open     R/H Dumbell Deadlift 105k

Bill Wright                                80        65+      R/H Dumbell C+Jerk 35k

Karen Gardner                         80        50+      R/H Mid Finger Lift 40k  -  R/H Index Finger Lift 40k

Nicola Hughes                          90        Open     2 inch bar Straddle D Lift 107.5k  -  L/H Zercher 60k

Chris Hughes                           70        J18/19   2 inch bar Straddle D Lift  155k

James Gardner                         95        Open    R/H Dumbell Deadlift 147k

Robbie Hughes                         60        J14/15   Trap Bar Deadlift 135k

Agnes Mcinally                         65        M50+     2 inch bar Straddle Deadlift 90k

George Dick                            125+    M60+     Steinborn Lift 115k -  Front Squat  110k

Graham Saxton                       110      M45+     Steinborn Lift 137.5  -  2 inch bar Hacklift 202.5k

Chris Ross                              95        Open      L/H Middle finger Lift 102.7k

Mathew Finkle                         70        M40+     2 inch bar Hacklift 120k

Alex Rigbye                            95        Open      2 Hands Thumbless Deadlift 142.5

Tom Moffat                             95        Open      Trap Bar Deadlift 260k – 2 inch bar Straddle D Lift 230k

Steve Angell                           110      Open      Trap bar Deadlift 300k

Joshua Haydock                      70        J18/19    Trap Bar Deadlift 182.5k  – Front Squat  105k

Mark Haydock                         125      Open      2 Hands Thumbless D Lift 200k – Trap Bar D Lift 323.5k

Denny Habecker                      90        M65+     Seated C+ Press B/Neck 60k – Trap Bar D Lift 160k

Alan Higgs                               95        M50+     Trap Bar Deadlift 190k

Andy Tomlin                            95        M40+     Middle Fingers Deadlift 140k

Steve Andrews                        70        M50+     R/H Zercher 100k – L/H Thumbless D Lift 66k

Karl Birkinshaw                       85        Open      Reflex C + Push Press 62.5k – Bwt Reps DLift 83k x 41 reps

Graham Always                       110      Open      L/H Bench Press 32.5k

2 Man Lifts:

David McFadzean and Chris Hughes    (Open 100k Class)     2 Man Hacklift 280k

Mathew Finkle and Robbie Hughes  (Open 70k Class)    2 Man Straddle Dead Lift 250k

Andy Tomlin and Chris Ross (Open 95k Class)  2 Man Straddle Dead Lift 350k

MC Recorder: Steve Gardner  Assistant: Judy Habecker  Drug Testing: Frank Allen

Referees: Frank Allen  Steve Andrews  Denny Habecker  Andy Tomlin  Agnes Mcinally  David Mcfadzean  Karen Gardner  George Dick  Graham Saxton  James Gardner

IAWA Age Adjustment Changed

by Al Myers

The long standing debate on whether the age adjustment should be changed was resolved this month at the World Council Meeting held in conjunction with the IAWA World Championships. This discussion started last year at the World Meeting, which was held in England, by Wilf Chapman of Australia. Wilf felt that the older lifters were not being compensated adequately by the age adjustment. After discussion, the membership felt that this needed to be looked into further before any changes would be made.

Steve Gardner and Graham Saxton of England, and myself of the United States, conducted separate studies on the age adjustment. Both of our studies supported that the age correction formula that has been used is very inadequate for lifters over the age of 65. These studies were presented to the membership at the Meeting this year, and finally, this issue has been resolved! The USAWA and the IAWA(UK) have always used different age correction formulas, but the IAWA has previously used the USAWA formula, which gives 1 percent per year starting at the age of 40. The IAWA(UK) gives 1 percent per year starting at age 36 and then 2 percent per year starting at age 66.

What was agreed upon by the membership was a compromise of these two correction systems. Now for IAWA competitions, a lifter receives 1 percent per year starting at the age of 40, and at the age of 66 receives 2 percent.

Now my opinion..

I truly believe that for our organization to grow we must always tilt the formula to allow a strong young lifter to beat a strong older lifter. Best lifters should be decided by the weight lifted and not by a formula. However, the previous system didn’t even allow the older lifter (over the age of 65) to even be in consideration. Contrary to what those on the “other side” of this argument (not wanting to see any changes) might say – this small change will not let older lifters easily beat young lifters!! Just look at the studies and the numbers and you will see what I am saying. Giving a 70 year old lifter 36 percent adjustment is still not much compared to what they really should be getting if we want complete equality (the studies showed that 90 percent correction is needed for a 70 year old). By the way, these studies were done using data from the USAWA and IAWA Record Lists which provided over 20 years of data collection!! I base my opinion on numbers and statistics and not “gut feelings”.

I was also glad to see the age correction adjustment still starting at the age of 40. This seems logical to me – as it is the time a lifter enters the Masters division and becomes eligible for Masters age group records. Now I hope that the USAWA and the IAWA(UK) will come together on this and both adopt the IAWA system for age correction. Unification on this would be a good thing for the IAWA.

Minutes from the IAWA World Council Meeting

by Steve Gardner

Picture left to right: IAWA President Steve Gardner, Meet Directors Judy and Denny Habecker

IAWA World Council Meeting

Held at 4pm on Saturday 3rd October 2009 – Lebanon PA. U.S.A.

Present: England: Steve Gardner Karen Gardner Mark Haydock Josh Haydock Roger Davis and John Kavanagh Scotland: George Dick USA: John Vernacchio Al Myers Chad Ullom Dennis Vandermark John Monk Frank Ciavattone Art Montini Bill Spayd Scott Schmidt Howard Prechtel Bob Geib Dennis Mitchell Denny Habecker

Apologies: Frank Allen (UK)

The Meeting was chaired by IAWA President: Steve Gardner

A discussion on the minutes of the World Council Meeting held in October 2008 at Burton on Trent, England, revealed two points that were due to be re discussed:

The Continental to the Belt

There had been a request for the lift to be considered as two different lifts … performed using an Olympic style pull…alternativley using a Zercher style. Dennis Mitchell reported that the Technical Committee were unanimous in their recommendation to the meeting that the lift be left as it is. This was reasoned as being a lift performed in the ‘Continental’ style meaning anyway or how. After further discussion on the matter a vote was taken, it was felt that part of the excitement of the lift was the fact it can be done in different ways. The proposal to the meeting being that the lift be left unchanged and just one lift …this was carried unanimously.

Age percentage for Master Lifters at the World Championships

It was suggested in 2008 that maybe the age percent allowance for Master lifters is not sufficient. A study was conducted by Steve Gardner and Graham Saxton from the UK and also by Al Myers from the USA. Both camps agreed that the current allowance sees the Master lifters fall away from the level playing field, after 60 to 70 years of age, and quite significantly after 80 years of age. Many different ideas and proposals were discussed, in the end a proposal was formulated that everyone present seemed happy with. The majority of the Technical Committee were present and also in agreement, and the proposal was passed. Proposal was that percentage starts at 40 as at present but at 66 years of age the lifter gets 2 percent per year instead of just 1 (only for those years over 66). It was noted that if it is felt in the future that this system does not work, we are at liberty to change back or change otherwise.

International Venues

The World Championships for 2010 is already set as Glasgow, Scotland in early October

Promoter is George Dick

George proposed the lifts for the competition to the meeting, and they agreed and passed:

Day One – 2 Hands Clean and Push Press / 1 Hand Barbell Snatch / Cont. to Belt / Steinborn

Day Two – Cheat Curl / 1 Hand Dumbell Press (opp Hand)/ Trap Bar Deadlift

The Gold Cup for 2010 – A proposal was made for Frank Ciavattone to run the event in Boston

In early November. Frank said he would look forward to arranging the competition – All agreed to sanction the application BUT there would be no heavy chain lifts without prior consultation with Frank

The World Championships for 2011 – A letter of application was received from the Australian IAWA group via Justine Martin to run the Championships in late September. The Promoter would be Peter Phillips. After discussion the meeting accepted and sanctioned the proposal.

The Gold Cup for 2011, an application was received from Steve Gardner to run the event in early November in England, if another venue in England was nor forthcoming. All agreed and sanctioned.

Any Other business

Dennis Mitchell informed the meeting that he had received a letter from Bill Chapman, asking that at future World Championships could two best overall Masters awards be given, one for under 60 years an one for over 60 years. It was discussed and agreed that promoters can do this if they wish, but our current situation is that it is up to the promoters as to which awards they feel inclined to present, and is not mandatory.

Dennis Habecker appealed to lifters within the IAWA organization to be mindful of sending in entries for competitions before the said entry deadlines, so as to assist the meet directors to be able to run the competitions.

There being no other business – The President: Steve Gardner,thanked all for their attendance and closed the meeting.

IAWA Team Postal

Individual Results from the IAWA World Team Postal Competition

by Al Myers

Rick Meldon - Top Individual at the World Team Postal Competition

Along with figuring Team results, the meet organizer Steve Gardner, also figured individual results from the IAWA World Team Postal Competition.  The individual winner of this postal competition was Rick Meldon, England, of the Sunbury Club. Congratulations Rick!!! Rick’s team also won the Team Title – making him a double winner.  Rick Meldon has been winning championships in the IAWA since the IAWA origin, starting with his first overall best lifter victory in 1990.  He was the Best Master Lifter , Best Open Lifter, and the Overall Best Lifter in the 2008 IAWA World Championships held in Burton, England on October 4th & 5th, 2008. At this meet, he was crowned “Champion of Champions”. The Meet Director, Steve Gardner, had invited all the previous Overall Best Lifters to this meet to compete against each other to decide who was the Champion of Championsl!  Rick has won two other Overall Best Lifter titles at the IAWA World Meet, in 1992 and 2004. Rick has more Overall Best Lifter titles at the World Meet than anyone else in the history of the IAWA.

Top Individuals in the Postal Competition

1.   Rick Meldon, England        432.5 pts
2.   Al Myers, USA                   379.5 pts
3.   Steve Sherwood, England  369.5 pts
4.   Nick Swain, England          349.4 pts
5.   Steve Andrews, England    346.8 pts
6.   Chad Ullom, USA               329.4 pts
7.   Peter Phillips, Australia      324.1 pts
8.   Graham Saxton, England   321.3 pts
9.   Phillipe Crisp, England       312.5 pts
10. James Gardner, England    298.9 pts

These point totals were calculated using bodyweight adjustments, age adjustments, and applying the Blindt Formula.  For those not familiar with the Blindt Formula, it involves multiplying each lift by a factor that is supposed to bring all lifts to the same weighted value.  Every lift has a different factor.  The intended purpose of using the Blindt Formula is to keep the heavier lifts from being a bigger part of a lifter’s total than the lighter lifts.  The Blindt Formula has not been used recently in any USAWA competitions.

FULL MEET RESULTS:

A word from the Organiser:

This postal competition was organised as a ‘Fun’ team event, for teams of three, but also with the flexibility to allow individual lifters to join in to see where they rank amongst the other lifters. We had lifters from England, USA and Australia taking part, and from the ages divisions of Juniors 13 + Under through to the Masters  75+. Well done to all who took part, I will organise another competition for next year with four different lifts. Please see below that the results are figured first as teams and then as individuals. Best Wishes and Happy Lifting – Steve Gardner


(3 Teams comprised of only 2 members, but there were also 3 individual lifters, so the individuals were added to those teams as ‘guests’ to round things up into teams of 3.)

Pos.     Team                                      Team Members                                             Amended Points

1          Hastings Warriors 1 (Eng)         Nick Swain   Phillipe Crisp  Sam Hills                        963.6

2          Sunbury1 (Eng)                       Rick Meldon  Tom Meldon  Tom Chantler                   961.3

3          Dino Gym (USA)                      Al Myers Chad Ullom   Darren Barnhart                    931.8

——————————————————————————————————————-

4          Haven Hotshots (Eng)               Steve Sherwood   Tom Allsop  Stewart Brookes        920.8

5          Powerhouse Gym (Eng)            James Gardner  Jon Eccleshall Graham Saxton          890.9

6          Belmont WA (Australia)             Peter Phillips   Samuel Trew   Nic Porter (Guest)       808.1

7          Old and Done (USA)                 Jim Malloy   Scott Schmidt  Bill Crozier                     745.3

8          Granby Grippers (Eng)              Steve & Daniel Andrews  Karl Birkinshaw (Guest)     735.1

9          Hastings Warriors 2 (Eng)          Steve Shah   Ed Shortle  Gordon Fairey                   703.4

10        Haven Heroes (Eng)                  John Kavanagh Dave Moreton  Peter Lee (Guest)      674.4

11        Sunbury 2 (Eng)                       Jeff Luther  Trevor Evans  Nick Sayce                       598.8

Individual Amended Totals – Ranking of all lifters

(After Bodyweight, Age and Blindt Formulas are applied)

1          Rick Meldon               (Eng)               432.5

2          Al Myers                     (USA)             379.5

3          Steve Sherwood          (Eng)              369.5

4          Nick Swain                 (Eng)               349.4

5          Steve Andrews           (Eng)               346.8

6          Chad Ullom                (USA)              329.4

7          Phillipe Crisp               (Eng)              326.3

8          Peter Phillips               (Australia)       324.1

9          Graham Saxton           (Eng)              321.3

10        James Gardner            (Eng)              298.9

—————————————————————

Individual Amended Totals – Rankings Continued

11        Scott Schmidt                                   294.7

12        Sam Hills                                          287.9

13        Tom Allsop                                       285.4

14        Tom Meldon                                     284.8

15        Steve Shah                                      281.5

16        Jonny Eccleshall                               270.7

17        Stewart Brookes                              265.9

18        John Kavanagh                                262.0

19        Jim Malloy                                       260.9

20        Samuel Trew                                   250.8

21        Tom Chantler                                  244.1

22        Dave Morton                                   241.9

23        Ed Shortle                                      237.2

24        Nic Porter                                       233.4

25        Darren Barnhart                              222.9

26        Jeff Luther                                      210.5

27        Karl Birkinshaw                               210.1

28        Trevor Evans                                  210.0

29        Gordon Fairey                                 184.7

30        Nick Sayce                                      178.3

31        Daniel Andrews                               178.2

32        Peter Lee                                        170.6

33        Bill Crozier                                      189.7

Individual Class Winners and Positions – World ‘Open’ Postal 2009

Juniors13+U

Daniel Andrews          J13 +Under  55k Champion

OPEN

Stewart Brooks           Open 70k Champion

Nic Porter                   Open  75k  4th

Nick Sayce                 Open 75k   6th

Jonny Eccleshall          Open 80k   2nd

Karl Birkinshaw           Open  85k  5th

John Kavanagh            Open 90k   3rd

James Gardner            Open  95k Champion

Phillipe Crisp               Open  100k  Champion

Gordon Fairey              Open  100k  2nd

Chad Ullom                 Open  105k  Champion

Samuel Trew               Open  105k  2nd

Tom Chantler               Open  125k Champion

Masters 40+

Nick Swain                  Open  90k  Champion  and  40+  90k  Champion

Al Myers                     Open 120k Champion  and  40+ 120k Champion

Darren Barnhart          Open 125+ Champion  and  40+ 125k Champion

Masters 45+

Steve Andrews            Open 75k Champion  and   45+  75k Champion

Rick Meldon                 Open 85k Champion  and   45+  85k Champion

Sam Hills                     Open 85k 2nd   and      45+  85k  2nd

Tom Allsop                   Open 90k  2nd  and      45+  90k  Champion

Graham Saxton            Open 110k Champion  45+  110k Champion

Masters 50+

Dave Morton               Open 75k 2nd   and   50+  75k Champion

Jeff Luther                  Open 75k 5th    and   50+  75k  3rd

Ed Shorttle                  Open 75k 3rd    and   50+  75k  2nd

Tom Meldon                Open 85k  3rd   and   50+  85k  Champion

Masters 55+

Steve Sherwood          Open 80k  Champion  and   55+  80k  Champion

Peter Phillips               Open 110k Champion and   55+  110k Champion

Scott Schmidt              Open 120k  2nd  and  55+  120k  Champion

Masters 60+

Steve Shah                  Open  85k  4th   and  60+  85k  Champion

Trevor Evans                Open  85k   6th  and  60+  85k  2nd

Masters 65+

Jim Malloy                   Open  115k  Champion   and 65+  115k Champion

Masters 70+

Bill Crozier                  Open 105k  2nd  and   70+ 105k Champion

Masters 75+

Peter Lee                    Open 85k  7th    and  75+  85k  Champion

Individual Lift Rankings

(After Bodyweight, Age and Blindt Formula is applied)

Squat Rankings

1          Rick Meldon               240.5               139.2

2          Al Myers                    272.5               128.8

3          Phillipe Crisp              240.5               120.3

4          Peter Phillips              210                  114.7

5          Nick Swain                 200.5               113.4

6          Steve Sherwood         160                  108.0

7          Tom Meldon               170.5               104.9

8          Chad Ullom                220                  104.4

9          Steve Shah                155.5               101.6

10        Steve Andrews            145                  97.8

————————————————————-

11        Scott Schmidt              182                  96.4

12        Graham Saxton           190                  96.3

13        Tom Chantler              210.5               94.4

14        Sam Hills                    155.5               92.1

15        Darren Barnhart          210                  90.1

16        Tom Allsop                  150                  85.1

17        Jim Malloy                   137.5               83.7

18        Samuel Trew               170                  79.3

19        James Gardner            150                  75.8

20        Ed Shortle                   105.5               70.1

21        Nic Porter                    115                  67.6

22        Jonny Eccleshall           120                  66.3

23        Trevor Evans               95                    65.3

24        John Kavanagh            127.5               64.5

25        Dave Morton               95                    63.3

26        Bill Crozier                  92.5                 62.7

27        Gordon Fairey              125.5               61.8

28        Daniel Andrews           62.5                 60.8

29        Stewart Brookes          95                    58.4

30        Karl Birkinshaw           100                  53.6

31        Nick Sayce                  85                    49.4

32        Peter Lee                     60                    49.1

33        Jeff Luther                   70                    48.2

Pullover and Push Rankings

1          Rick Meldon               180.5               117.8

2          Nick Swain                 153                  97.6

3          Steve Andrews           127.5               97.0

4          Al Myers                     170                  90.6

5          Chad Ullom                160                  85.6

6          Steve Sherwood         110                  83.8

7          Phillipe Crisp              140.5               80.1

8          Graham Saxton          135                  77.5

9          Tom Meldon               110.5               76.7

10        Jim Malloy                  105                  72.1

————————————————————

Pullover and Push Rankings Continued

11        James Gardner            120                  68.4

12        Sam Hills                     100.5               67.1

13        Stewart Brooks           95                    65.8

14        Tom Allsop                 100                  64.0

15        Scott Schmidt             105                  62.7

16        Jeff Luther                  77.5                 60.1

16        Dave Morton               80                    60.1

18        John Kavanagh           100                  57.0

19        Peter Phillips               85                    52.3

20        Jonny Eccleshall          90                    56.0

21        Steve Shah                 70.5                 51.9

22        Trevor Evans               65                    50.4

23        Samuel Trew               90                    47.3

24        Ed Shortle                   60.5                 45.3

25        Karl Birkinshaw           70                    42.3

26        Tom Chantler              80.5                 40.7

27        Nick Sayce                  60                    39.3

28        Nic Porter                    55                    36.4

29        Gordon Fairey              65.5                 36.3

30        Peter Lee                     39.1                 36.0

31        Daniel Andrews            31.7                 34.8

32        Bill Crozier                  42.5                 32.5

33        Darren Barnhart           65                    31.4

Straddle Deadlift Rankings

1          Steve Sherwood          200                  96.5

2          Rick Meldon                 230.5               95.3

3          Al Myers                     250                  84.4

4          Peter Phillips               210                  82.0

5          Sam Hills                    190.5               80.6

6          Chad Ullom                235                  79.7

7          James Gardner           220                  79.5

8          Jonny Eccleshall          200                  78.9

9          Graham Saxton           200                  78.4

10        Phillipe Crisp               210.5               76.1

————————————————————

11        Nic Porter                    180                  75.6

12        Tom Meldon                 170.5               75.0

13        Steve Shah                  160.5               74.9

14        Steve Andrews             155                  74.7

14        Stewart Brooks            170                  74.7

16        Samuel Trew               220                  73.4

17        Nick Swain                 180.5               73.0

18        Darren Barnhart          235                  72.0

19        Ed Shortle                  150.5               71.5

20        Scott Schmidt             182                  68.9

Straddle Deadlift Rankings Continued

21        Tom Chantler             210.5               67.4

22        John Kavanagh           180                  65.1

22        Karl Birkinshaw          170                  65.1

24        Tom Allsop                 160                  64.9

25        Jim Malloy                  137.5               59.8

26        Dave Morton               125                  59.5

27        Bill Crozier                  100                  55.7

28        Peter Lee                    90                    52.6

29        Gordon Fairey             140.5               49.4

30        Jeff Luther                  100                  49.2

31        Trevor Evans               100                  49.1

32        Daniel Andrews           62.5                 43.5

33        Nick Sayce                  100                  41.5

One Hand Clean And Jerk Rankings (L or R)

1          Steve Sherwood (R )   52.5                 81.2

2          Rick Meldon   (R )       60.5                 80.2

3          Steve Andrews  (R )    50                    77.2

4          Al Myers  (R )             70                    75.7

5          John Kavanagh (R )    65                    75.3

6          James Gardner  (R )    65                    75.2

7          Peter Phillips (R )         60                    75.1

8          Tom Allsop     (R )       55                    71.5

9          Jonny Eccleshall (R )    55                    69.5

10        Graham Saxton (R )     55                    69.1

————————————————————

11        Stewart Brooks (L )     47.6                 67.0

12        Scott Schmidt (R )       55                    66.7

13        Nick Swain (R )           50.5                 65.4

14        Chad Ullom (R )          55                    59.7

15        Dave Morton (R)         38.6                 58.9

16        Nic Porter (R )            40                    53.8

17        Jeff Luther (R )           33.7                 53.1

18        Steve Shah (L )           35.5                 53.1

19        Samuel Trew  (L )        47.5                 50.8

20        Ed Shortle (L )             33.0                 50.2

21        Phillipe Crisp (R )        43.0                 49.8

22        Karl Birkinshaw (L )     40                    49.1

23        Nick Sayce (R )           36.2                 48.1

23        Sam Hills (L )              35.5                 48.1

25        Jim Malloy (R )            32.5                 45.3

26        Trevor Evans (R )        28.7                 45.2

27        Tom Chantler (R )       40.5                 41.6

28        Daniel Andrews (R )     17.6                 39.2

29        Bill Crozier      (R )      25                    38.8

30        Gordon Fairey (R )       33.0                 37.2

31        Peter Lee (R )              17.6                 33.0

32        Darren Barnhart (R )    30                    29.4

33        Tom Meldon (R )           20                    28.2

Strength Through Variety (Part 2)

(Webmaster comment: The following is part of an interesting article written by All-Rounder John McKean several years ago. John has won many All-Round National and World Championships in his weight class, and has written articles for Muscular Development, Hardgainer, Strength and Health, Ironman, Powerlifting USA, and MILO)

by John McKean

John McKean demonstrating the Jefferson Lift, which is also known as the Straddle Deadlift.

A brief look at weightlifting’s history will quickly show that many of the above-mentioned lifts were the basis of meets during the 1900-1930 era. Rare was it when an early contest didn’t feature a one-arm snatch, dumbell swing, or the amazing bent-press (yes, it’s once again being given its due – number 48 on our all-round list). Extensive record lists on about 50 events were kept in the US and Great Britain prior to 1940, with other informal local listings recorded in both countries during the sixties and seventies.

When serious interest once again picked up, officials from the two lands met in 1987 to write a constitution and promote the new-to-many concept of all-round competition. When these modern day founding fathers established the up to date rules and regulations, they insisted on pure body dynamics to do the lifting – no super suits or supportive gear, no wraps, and absolutely no drugs.

About now, I’m certain many will question the feasibility of training limit poundages on 10-20 big lifts at a time. Doesn’t this go against the grain of current advice to avoid long routines? No. In fact, the real beauty of our all-round sessions is that we’re actually forced to restrict quality training time on each individual lift to an absolute minimum. The necessity of these ultra-abbreviated strength routines has taught us how to reach maximum intensity for handling true top weights more often than ever before.

Although there’s a wide range of effective schedules used by our present crop of all-rounders, and highly specialized methods for handling some of our more unique lifts, here’s a sample training procedure used by 12 of us at the Ambridge VFW Barbell Club, near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Essentially, we’ve achieved phenomenal progress over the past five years by doing single repetitions on each of about 6 exercises per workout. We switch lifts every day of our three weekly sessions so that a total of 18 moves are given a short, high-intensity burst once a week. After a special non-weight warmup (more on this later) we do just 3 singles per exercise, best characterized as heavy, heavier, and heaviest. The last attempt is usually fairly close to a limit. And, because this quick, brutal style of training seems to fuel our mental competitive aggression, we always feel motivated to try to up that poundage each week.

Sure, this is heavy stuff. Yet in all our collective time with all-round training, none of us has ever felt even slightly burned out, suffered serious injury, or even felt overly tired from a workout (contests are something else, however). It seems when gains keep coming as rapidly as they have, lifts are always being rotated, and workouts are over before we have a chance of even getting mentally fatigued, our sport always stays fresh, exciting, and ever challenging. After all, how hard can it be to perform a workout of only 18 reps? (Better wait to answer till you actually experience this unique form of intensity and variety).

Most all-round movements are complex by nature and work the entire body at once. Each exercise serves as a supplement to the others, so there’s absolutely no need to waste extra time on assistance exercises. This is also a big reason why we get away with training any particular lift but once a week; all muscle groups are pushed totally each training day, no matter what combination of exercises is employed. After all, why should we bother with, say, the highly overrated and widely overused bench press – very one dimensional when compared to the whole-body functioning of all-round’s dynamic pullover and push.

How well does all-round training serve the average person? Let me offer two rather extreme examples. On a novice level would be my 13-year old son Robbie. Beginning when he was 10, Robbie found immediate pleasure over his rapid strength gains. Thanks to the wide variety of moves and abbreviated training (yes, I put him on heavy singles immediately, despite dire warnings I’ve read by “experts”), he never experienced much muscle soreness nor ever any boredom with his quick workouts. In three years he has gained fifty pounds of muscle (puberty helped), tripled his strength, and has established fifty world records in the pre-teen division.

Recently, while on the way to winning his third consecutive title at 1992’s national championship in Boston, this 165-pound “little boy” performed a show-stopping hand and thigh (short range deadlift). I’ve never seen another youngster of this age who could match Rob’s grip strength to do a 250-pound one-arm deadlift, or the neck power to equal his 300-pound head harness lift. But early in his training, Robbie perceptively put me straight on what this sport is all about. Telling him to follow me downstairs to begin “exercising” one day, he firmly replied, “Dad, I don’t exercise, I lift.”

On the other end of the spectrum is longtime powerlifting and weightlifting competitor, 65-year old Art Montini. As is the case with all of us master lifters, Art discovered that no form of training or competition is as much fun as all-round lifting. Montini never misses one of these exciting workouts and seems to heft new personal bests each time he sets foot in a gym. Who says you stop gaining beyond 35? Art’s name is all over the current record book and he’s never failed to win the outstanding master award at any of our national meets. Seeing the agile oldster deftly upend a 300-pound barbell, twist and stoop to shoulder it then easily squat in the complicated Steinborn lift, or perform his mind-boggling 1,800-pound hip lift would convince anyone that Art drinks gallons daily from the fountain of youth.