Articles from November 2012



Lowering the Split Jerk

by Roger LaPointe

Magazine cover shot of Norbert Schemansky in a deep split.

Ask any 5 year old kid what a strongman does and you will probably see a fair demonstration of a clean & jerk. It is the best way to get the heaviest weight over your head.

Now look for the most efficient lifters of all time. The very best will drop low on their splits.

Splits?  What are you talking about?

I don’t mean splits like a martial artist or a cheer leader. I’m talking about split jerks. However, if you want to see some real skill based strength, watch the old time splitters and learn from them. One of the very best was Norbert Schemansky. He did all three lifts with a split: Snatch, Clean and Jerk. He was so good that the entire Russian Olympic Weightlifting team changed their style to match his, in 1956. You will see in the old photos that Norb had his back leg knee no more than an inch or two off the ground. Here is the theory: basically, the lower you drop under the bar, the less you have to explosively move the bar up.

3 Ways to Get Lower Split Jerks
1. Lunges. Do as many variations as you can come up with, but the barbell in the top clean position will be the most useful.
2. Half of the lift is done with the upper body. Make sure you stretch your chest and shoulders. The best way to do it is with a broom stick.
3. Make sure you do lots of split stretches for your legs. You need to focus not just on your hip flexors, but your hamstrings and low back.

Yes. Low back flexibility is essential for the side with the leading leg. Norb used to practice his Snatches and Cleans with a knee touch. Trust me, you aren’t going to get more extreme than that. Here is some great further info on this subject:

Norb’s Book (We have only 3 left.)
http://www.atomicathletic.com/store/ProductInfo.aspx?productid=BK081

All the best,
Roger LaPointe
“Today is a good day to lift.”

Macomb Fall RB

by Al Myers

MEET RESULTS
MACOMB FALL RECORD BREAKERS

Meet Results:

Macomb Fall Record Breakers
Salvation Army Gym
November 10th, 2012

Meet Director:  Tim Piper

Officials (1 official system used):  Tim Piper, Thom Van Vleck

Trenton Paul – BWT 74.5 KG, AGE 18 years

Reflex Clean and Push Press:  82 kg
Reflex Clean and Jerk: 90 kg

Tim Piper – BWT 88 kg, AGE 42 years

Clean and Jerk – Left Arm: 40 kg
Reflex Clean and Jerk:  82 kg
Reflex Clean and Push Press: 80 kg
Squat – Front: 100 kg

Dave Beversdorf – BWT 308 Pounds, AGE 47 years

Bench Press – Right Arm: 80 kg
Bench Press – Alternate Grip: 190 kg

Tim Piper and Trenton Paul – 90 kg bodyweight class, Open Age Division

Team Snatch - One Arm: 60 kg
Team Clean and Push Press: 162.5 kg
Team Clean and Jerk: 185 kg

Total Poundage

by Steve Gardner

Some were asking recently about the history of the IAWA Record for Total Poundage in 3 hours and 9 minutes. It was started by the late great Warren Lincoln Travis.

Here is the story:
Warren Lincoln Travis was the first famous strongman in the United States and a world champion back and hip lifter, who performed feats of strength on Coney Island in the first quarter of the 20th century.  Travis was born in Brooklyn and turned professional at age 21. He weighed only around 200 pounds at his prime. In 1906, he was awarded the “World’s Greatest Weightlifter” by a popular strength publication and received a jewel-studded belt.
His favorite lifts were the Heavy Lifts, such as the Harness Lift and the Back Lift, and Finger Lifts.  In front of witnesses, he lifted 3,985 pounds in the Harness Lift and 4,140 pounds in the Back Lift. In 1907, he lifted 667 pounds with one finger.

Travis was a successful as a businessman and became very wealthy. For 55 years, he held the record for total poundage lifted, that is, lifts done for repetitions, where the lifter may choose any lift and rep/set scheme, to lift the most weight within a given time frame. The standard for this record was initially set by Travis in 1927, when he Back Lifted 5.5 million pounds in 3 hours, 9 minutes.  He did this by doing 5500 reps with 1000 pounds. His record was broken in 1982 by Howard Prechtel (who later became first President of IAWA) who Back Lifted 6,066,060 pounds in 3 hours, 9 minutes.

John Davis, Olympic Champion

 by Dennis Mitchell

John H. Davis

John H. Davis was born January 12, 1921 in Smithtown, Long Island.  As a youngster his favorite sports were gymnastics and track.  He lived near a park where he would play on the rings and the high bar.  He was exceptionally good at chinning, and could chin with either hand while holding a 25 pound weight in the free hand.  Weightlifter Steve Walsky saw John at the playground and invited him to work out at his home gym.  John worked out hard and long, often five days a week.   At this time, 1937, he saw a strong man weightlifting strength show where he met Bob Hoffman.  Not long after he entered his first weightlifting contest where he took a second place.  This was a start in a long and successful career.

John said that his original interest was in body building, but felt that a negro would never win the Mr. America title.  At a body weight of 180 pounds and standing 5′8.5″, he had a 17″ neck, 16″ arms,13.75″ fore arms, and  16″ calfs.  He trained very hard, and was ahead of his time as he included both squats and bench presses in his workouts.  It was believed at that time that squats would make you slow, and that bench presses would hinder overhead lifting.  John won his first world championship as a light heavy weight at the age of 17, in Vienna, Austria. He went on to win eight world, twelve national championships and two Olympics. During his long career he set sixteen world records.   He did this even though his career was interrupted for three years serving in the army during the world war.  He was also the first lifter to clean and jerk over 400 pounds (402) using a standard barbell and was the second person to total 1,000 pounds on the three lifts.

John Davis passed away July 13, 1984.

Gardner wins Prechtel Trophy!

by Al Myers

James Gardner wins the Prechtel Trophy as the BEST LIFTER of the 2012 IAWA Gold Cup.

For the first time ever, an award was given at the IAWA Gold Cup to represent the event’s BEST LIFTER.  This award is given in remembrance of the late Howard Prechtel, who served three terms as the IAWA President.   The concept of the Gold Cup was Howard’s idea – and the Gold Cup has indeed blossomed into one of the major IAWA events. This award will from now on become an annual award, and appropriately called the Howard Prechtel Memorial Trophy. 

This year’s winner goes to JAMES GARDNER of England, having performed an outstanding World Record Turkish Get Up of 75 kilograms.  James is more than deserving of this award, and showed unbelievable tenacity to even be there competing.  James showed up late, as he was suffering from the intestinal flu the night before, and looked like he was not going to be able to do anything, let alone a big lift like he did!  Congrats James – you earned it!

The rankings were done by using the Blindt Formula.  This formula multiplies a Blindt Factor against total adjusted points to put all lifts on a “level playing field”.  Each lift is assigned a different factor, depending on the lift.  The top placements using this formula were:

1.  James Gardner – 75 KG Turkish Get Up
2.  Steve Sherwood – 125 KG Lunge Squat
3.  Luke Davis – 50 KG Turkish Get Up
4.  Timo Lauttemaus – 127.5 KG Index Fingers Deadlift
5.  Gary Ell – 185 KG 2″ Bar Hacklift

Gold Cup

by Steve Gardner

IAWA 2012 GOLD CUP – Castlemilk Gym, Glasgow, Scotland – Saturday 3rd November

Group picture from the 2012 Gold Cup

A great event with 29 lifters, 28 breaking and setting new IAWA World Records with some terrific performances across the board- Countries represented: USA Scotland England and Finland. Well done to Andy Tomlin and Matt Finkle the event promotors and to everyone who helped make the event possible.

Winners of the 2 Man 1 Hand Deadlift Challenge: Al Myers and Chad Ullom – USA

Winners of the Howard Prechtel Memorial Trophy: First James Gardner, Second Steve Sherwood and Third Luke Davis.

GOLD CUP RESULTS – Gold Cup 2012 Results

Our Trip to the Dinnie Stones

by Al Myers

The three that lifted the Dinnie Stones unassisted (without straps) - (left to right): Mark Haydock, Al Myers, and Chad Ullom

One of the most exciting experiences of my life occurred the day following the IAWA Gold Cup.  Gold Cup promoters Andy Tomlin and Matthew Finkle arranged an organized trip to visit the famous Dinnie Stones.  This trip was planned and announced many months in advance and several IAWA lifters took part.  Participants included men from Scotland, England, United States, and Finland. As we were making the road trip to the Potarch Hotel and crossing through the beautiful  Scottish Highlands and the snow covered Cairngorm Mountains, anxiety and anticipation filled the atmosphere of the car. Once we arrived it was exciting to see several locals had showed up to witness our efforts. Apparently the word had gotten out!  I would say there were 10-15 people in attendance to watch our efforts in undertaking the challenge of lifting the Dinnie Stones. 

Donald Dinnie left these stones for future generations to test their strength.  I have previously read the book, “Donald Dinnie – The First Sporting Superstar” by David Webster and Gordon Dinnie several times, and it is a tremendous account of Donald Dinnie and his achievements.  Anyone should read this book before making the trip to the Potarch Hotel to fully realize and recognize the historical significance of these stones. The latest issue of MILO (September, 2012 Volume 20, Issue 2) included an excellent Dinnie Stone article written by the legendary Scottish Highland Game athlete Francis Brebner. I have read several articles concerning the Dinnie Stones, and this article by Francis is the best one I have ever read. I have had the opportunity to “share the throwing field” with Francis in several past professional Highland Games, and I can attest firsthand what an upstanding individual Francis is in the strength community.   Another important reference should be the Dinnie Stone website http://gordondinnie.com/Stones.html , which includes many of the successful lifts by strong men in past history.  The top of the website lays out the challenges made by Donald Dinnie and his stones in his own words, which I would like to repeat here:

The stones weighing a total of 785lbs. were carried by Donald Dinnie in 1860.

Here is Donald’s own account of the event written by him in 1912.

“On the granite stone bridge that crosses the River Dee at Potarch there  were, and still are, two large stones weighing about 8cwt the pair, placed in a recess. In the early 1830’s massive iron rings were placed in them, to which ropes were fixed so that scaffolds could be attached for pointing the bridge. Now, one of these stones was somewhat heavier than the other. Very few strong men of that day could lift the heavy one withbothhands, but my father could raise one in each hand with apparent ease, and could throw the heavier stone of the two on to the top of a parapet wall of the bridge. Those stones are still on the bridge and I myself lifted one in each hand on many occasions and one market day, I carried them across the bridge and back, some four to five yards.”

It is easy to see from those words that three challenges were issued by Donald Dinnie regarding the Dinnie Stones, 1. Lift the stones for height (to the top of a parapet wall) 2. Lift the stones for repetitions (lifted one in each hand on many occasions) and 3. Carry them for distance (carried them across the bridge and back, some four or five yards).

The Dinnie Stones represent a different individual challenge for every person.  Lifting stones is NOT a weightlifting meet - there is no trophy for winning or being the best.  I feel anyone who meets the challenge that they set out for themselves with the Dinnie Stones is worthy of praise, as this is what stone lifting should be all about.  It’s a inner battle against the stone that lays before you which drives you to ”rise to the occasion” and give everything that you have, both mentally and physically, to accomplish the goal set forth.  If you do that, you have been successful in your quest and should  know in your heart that by doing so you have met the challenge of the Dinnie Stones.  The degree of this challenge is different for every man.

Now let me get to the details of this glorious day of those that had taken part!!  I kept very accurate records of the accounts of the day as I want this to be reported with accuracy.  Ten men took part in this memorable event. Below is a summary chart of what transpired:

Participant Age BWT Dinnie Stone Accomplishment
Alex Rigbye, ENGLAND  27 89kg 7 Repetitions with both stones assisted (WITH STRAPS)
Josh Haydock, ENGLAND 22 80kg 1 Repetition with both stones assisted (WITH STRAPS), and 3 Repetitions with small stone unassisted 
Barry Gordge, ENGLAND 51 104kg 1 Repetition with small stone unassisted
George Dick, SCOTLAND 64 123kg 1 Repetition with small stone using both hands unassisted
Mark Haydock, ENGLAND 37 115kg 25 Repetitions with both stones unassisted, walk with both stones unassisted a total of 3 feet
Chad Ullom, UNITED STATES 40 112kg 25 Repetitions with both stones unassisted
Andy Tomlin, SCOTLAND 45 92kg Lifted both small and large stone one handed unassisted
Timo Lauttemaus, FINLAND 33 98kg Lifted large stone unassisted with left hand and held for a time of 14.3 seconds
Matt Finkle, SCOTLAND 46 65kg Lifted both small and large stone with two hands unassisted
Al Myers, UNITED STATES 46 111kg 1 Repetition with both stones unassisted

(NOTES: I want to mention that these ages and bodyweights are official, as they were used in entry in the previous days’ IAWA Gold Cup Championships.  Also, I want to thank James McKenna for attending this activity, as he was the one responsible for several of the pictures that were taken.  The Dinnie Stone lifting took place over an hour and a half, from 10:30 AM to noon on November 4th., 2012)

I was so impressed with Alex Rigbye and Josh Haydock.  These two young men brimmed with enthusiasm, and gained much respect from myself and others by their tenacity.  Josh was set on trying to lift both stones unassisted, and tried numerous times to no avail.  He easily lifted the small stone unassisted, but the large stone was just slightly out of his capabilities.  It surely wasn’t because of lack of effort!  He tried and tried, and then totally exhausted resorted to using lifting straps to complete one good repetition of both stones.  It was a gallant lift, considering that he had previously “given it all”.  Alex was intent on getting as many reps as he could using straps, and “gutted out” 7 repetitions.  I told both of these young men what an outstanding effort they had given, and that they should use this day to give them the motivation to come back in future years and succeed lifting the stones unassisted.  I KNOW that they will do that  - as the challenge of the Dinnie Stones is now embedded in their soul.  

I had just met Barry Gordge for the first time this weekend.  Barry, at age 51, is one strong man.  The day before I watched Barry do a one arm Zercher of 142.5 kgs.  Barry lifted the small stone quite easily one handed unassisted.  This was his first experience taking on the Dinnies.  He did not try to use straps to lift both of  them together  - but if he would have I know that he would have had no problem lifting both of them at the same time.

George Dick and Matt Finkle came focused on lifting both stones two handed.  George handled the small Dinnie Stone several times as well as Matt.  After a few failed attempts at the big stone two handed, Matt finally succeeded!  It was one of the most impressive lifts of the day.  Matt only weighs 65 kilograms and I am sure the large stone is exceeding his max deadlift.  Holding onto the Dinnie Stone ring is WAY HARDER than gripping a bar, but due to his persistence he was successful!

This is one of the 25 reps done by Mark Haydock during the course of the day.

Mark Haydock and Chad Ullom came into the day only hoping to be successful lifting both stones unassisted (without straps).  Both had never attempted the Dinnie Stones before, and even though they knew their capabilities lifting on ring handled pin loaders, these stones offer different challenges with unknown uncertainties.  Mark has just recently (5 months ago) had bicep reattachment on his right bicep. Anyone would have to question his sanity in attempting such a thing.  Both of these guys were very “fired up” on their first attempt, and proceeded to lift the Dinnie Stones unassisted for one repetition with ease!  After doing this, they decided to go after more repetitions to fully test their capabilities.  I sat back and watched in amazement!  Once they got close to 20 repetitions, I suggested that they go for 25 total reps as that would mark the 25 year celebration of the International All Round Weightlifting Association. This challenge I issued pushed them a few reps further.  I want to emphasize that all these reps were done WITHOUT STRAPS.  I will never take away from anyone lifting the Dinnie Stones with straps, as if that was the challenge they were presented with and succeeded then success was obtained.  But lifting the Dinnie Stones  unassisted (without straps) is a challenge of a much higher level, and no one should be fooled in thinking lifting with straps is the same as lifting without.  The limit is the ability to hold the grip, and both Mark and Chad have WORLD CLASS hook grips to go along with their strong backs.  I believe that this is the most repetitions anyone has ever lifted the Dinnie Stones in one day, which is a great accomplishment.  As I’ve said earlier in this story, total repetitions have always been a part of Dinnie Stone lifting history, as recorded on the Dinnie Stone website.   Well over 50% of all  Dinnie Stone lifters on that website have pushed their body limits with repetitions. 

Chad Ullom with a successful unassisted lift with the Dinnie Stones.

Mark also took “a shot” at walking with both Dinnie Stones without straps. In Francis’s article, he talked about two other athletes walking with the stones in the past.  Calum  Morrison was one of the first to do so, walking 2 feet in 1997.  Glenn Ross was another who attempted to match Donald Dinnie’s feat of crossing the bridge carrying both stones (a distance slightly over 5 yards).  Ross gave a ferocious attempt, making it 5 feet 5 inches.  I was slightly surprised Mark was even going to give this a try, after already lifting the stones for many repetitions.  I thought his grip obviously had to be impaired from this previous lifting.  But not only did he walk a total of 3 feet - he didn’t use straps!!!  He lifted the stones “side by side” and with the stones beating on his legs with every small step, he moved slowly over the distance.  I should mention that Mark did this in the soft gravel out in front of the hotel, and chose his course slightly uphill toward the street.  This HAS to be one of the most impressive feats ever done with the Dinnie Stones.  If there is a man to match Donald Dinnies feat of carrying the stones across the bridge without sitting either one down – my money is on Mark.  I want to make another comment about Mark and Chad’s Dinnie Stone lifting efforts.  All of the lifts were done on the soft gravel out of respect of not damaging the stones.  Several times I saw Chad’s feet slip on the loose gravel as he started his pull, which caused him to abandon the attempt and reset.  This added much more challenge to their efforts.  I have watched lifters on YouTube lift the Dinnie Stones on the concrete, and you can hear the “thub” every time when the stones are set down after their attempts.  This makes me shudder and cringe.  We, as stone lifters, need to take care of these stones for future generations.  Mark and Chad are very humble guys as well, you will never hear of them “bragging” about their successes with the Dinnie Stones in the future. 

Timo Lauttemaus has to be one of the first lifters from Finland to lay hands on the Dinnie Stones.  Timo has huge hands, and the day before did a 127.5 kg Index Finger Deadlift. However, the technique of hook gripping is new to him.  Chad and I explained the process of  hook gripping in the car on the way to the Potarch Hotel.  So what does he do?  He hooks grip for the FIRST TIME ever and lifts the big Dinnie Stone with his left hand and holds it for 14.3 seconds!!  Unbelievable if you ask me. 

Andy Tomlin successful with the large stone one handed unassisted. Andy and Matt Finkle were responsible for organizing this trip to the Dinnie Stones.

This was the third trip to the Dinnies for Andy Tomlin.  He had previously lifted the small stone with one hand, but never the big one.  He had the goal to lift the big one unassisted, and that is JUST WHAT HE DID.  It took a few attempts, but Andy “reached down deep” and gave one of the greatest efforts of the day.  After overcoming the many years disappointment with this big Dinnie Stone – he was finally successful! 

I can’t end this story without giving my account with my Dinnie Stone battle.  The first time I gave a shot at lifting the Dinnie Stones was in 2005.  At that time I was much stronger having around a 750 pound deadlift, but lacked the hook grip strength to lift the big stone.  I tried and tried on that occasion.  I told myself that I would come back at a latter date and succeed with this quest.  At that time I elected not to use straps as I knew I could lift them easily that way and I felt that that wasn’t my Dinnie Stone Challenge.  I wanted my first time to lift them to be unassisted.   However, I didn’t think that this trip would be that time yet.  I just recently had shoulder surgery (2 months ago), and haven’t been able to train with my left arm at all, and was concerned that attempting them may injure myself as I’m still recovering.  I didn’t even take my lifting belt with me on the trip to the Dinnies.  However, once there and watching everyone else push themselves with their challenges, I had a change of mind as I felt the draw of the Dinnie Stone mystic overtake me. I borrowed Chad’s belt for my attempt.  My first try I set my hook too deep and tore a huge chunk of flesh from my palm.  As I looked down I could see the blood trickling from my hand onto the large stone.  It took 10 minutes to get the bleeding to stop.  For a split second I thought “its got to be another day for me now”, but then I lost all rational thought and gave them another shot.  With no negative thoughts in my head, I gave it all I had and they came up!!  A goal I set for myself 7 years prior was now realized.  I told Mark and Chad afterwards that my one rep meant just as much to me as their 25 reps did to them!  That’s what the Dinnie Stones should be all about – taking on a challenge and being successful with great effort and determination.

Al Myers making a successful unassisted lift with the Dinnie Stones in front of a crowd on spectators.

This was a day that those of us involved will never forget in our lives.  I am proud of the fact that all of us are DRUG FREE, and have the negative tests to back up that statement.  Lots of blood and sweat were left on the Dinnie Stones (luckily no tears), but we left them in the same state as when we arrived for the next stone lifter to test his fortitude against the mighty challenge of the Dinnie Stones.  I am glad that I was able to be part of this day as it will forever tie all of us to the legacy of the Stones. Talks are already underway for our next organized trip to the Dinnie Stones – where new challenges will be set and higher achievements will be made.

The Dinnie Trip at the Gold Cup

by Al Myers

Art Montini lifting one of the Dinnie Stones in 2001, as part of the group of lifters that made the trip following the World Championships.

One of the exciting things that will happen at the Gold Cup is a day trip the following day to visit the Dinnie Stones.   Andy Tomlin has made arrangements for this to happen as a group activity.  It is something I’m really looking forward to.  I have only seen the Dinnie Stones once, and that was in 2005 when I was in Scotland competing in the Highland Games.  It looks like there will be at least 10 people making the trip.  

I won’t go into details of the Dinnie Stones – there are several blogs on this website that have done that previously.  I’m more interested right now in who will be able to pick them up on this trip.  I have a couple of lifters in mind that I think have an excellent shot at it.  I won’t mention names here as I don’t want to hex them beforehand.

This isn’t the first time that the Scots have combined a Dinnie Trip with a major meet.  The first trip was planned in 1996 after Worlds to go see the Dinnie Stones.  It was on that occassion that Frank Ciavattone lifted them, and became the first American to do so. Franks experience lifting them was told in this blog on the website: http://www.usawa.com/hall-of-fame-biography-frank-ciavattone-class-of-1996/   Then in 2001, again following the World Championships, a group of several lifters made the trek to the Bridge of Potarch, the “holding grounds” of the Dinnie Stones.  This was the day that Kevin Fulton lifted the Dinnie Stones, and became the second American to lift them (without straps and at the same time).    Kevin was quoted by Bill Clark in an old Strength Journal and this is what he had to say about it, ” The day after the competition we took a van full of lifters into the highlands to the Dinnie Stones.  Steve Angell and I both lifted them – all 775 pounds of them.  I was told Frank Ciavattone and I are the only Americans to ever lift them.  Steve also lifted the smaller stone – 330 pounds – to his chest. Not to be outdone, I deadlifted the small stone with only two fingers.  It was alot of fun lifting them, but very difficult for me. They are heavy and very awkward.  I was stiff and sore from the competition.  It has been a goal of mine for several years to lift them and now I’ve had the opportunity.”

It appears All Rounders have had a pretty good history of lifting the Dinnies.  The limiting factor is the grip – and most All Rounders have a much stronger hook grip than other lifters.  Gordon Dinnie has a comprehensive website devoted to those that have lifted these fabled stones – http://gordondinnie.com/Stones.html   To date, there have been only 4 Americans that have lifted them unassisted (without straps,  which is the ONLY WAY they should count as being lifted).   This is that short list:

1.  Frank Ciavattone,  Walpole, Massachusetts - September 24th, 1996
Frank’s lift was officiated by several IAWA officials and a certificate of completion was given to Frank by Frank Allen.

2.  Keven Fulton, Litchfield, Nebraska – October 8th, 2001
Kevin’s lift was also officiated by several IAWA officials.

3.  Bill Crawford, New Hampshire – October 3rd, 2005

4.  Travis Willingham, Blue Springs, Missouri – September 7th, 2009

As you notice, two of these four have been very active USAWA members.  Will this list be expanded by another all-rounder after the 2012 Gold Cup?  I predict it will.

Macomb Fall RB

by Tim Piper

MEET ANOUNCEMENT – MACOMB FALL RECORD BREAKER

Tim Piper "in action" at the 2012 USAWA National Championships in Las Vegas. Tim did outstanding - placing 6th overall!!!

November 10th, 2012 the Macomb Salvation Army will host its second USAWA record breaker meet of the year.  This meet will actually follow directly after another meet, the American Drug Free Powerlifting Federation Macomb Push/Pull meet set for the morning.  We thought it might be nice for both federation lifters to mix together a bit and share in this day of strength.  Both organizations are aligned on their stance against drug use so we thought it could be a win-win.  Come out in the morning to watch, or compete, in the bench press and deadlift and stick around for some record attempts in the all-rounds.  We already have some lifters who are planning on both events that day!

Hope to see some out-of-towners at the meet but even if you can’t make it we will do our best to set as many records as we can and make the USAWA proud.

ENTRY FORM (PDF) – Macomb Fall Record Breaker

Gold Cup

by Al Myers

MEET ANNOUNCEMENT – 2012 GOLD CUP

Members of the Castlemilk Gym Club at the 2010 IAWA World Championships, which they hosted.

I’m very excited to finally announce the plans for this year’s IAWA Gold Cup, to be held at the Castlemilk Community Centre in Glasgow, Scotland.  I have been to the Castlemilk Gym a few times now, and each experience has been a very enjoyable time!  They have a very active all-round lifting club, with members that are very enthused about All Round Weightlifting. The promoters of this year’s Gold Cup are Andy Tomlin and Matthew Finkle (as listed on the entry form), but I know the promotion of this will be an entire club affair, so no details will be left unattended.  This is the FOURTH time that the Castlemilk Gym Club has hosted the Gold Cup ( also in 2009, 2004, & 1999).  David McFadzean was the promoter in 2009 and Willie Wright was the promoter in 2004. 

One “special addition” to this year’s Gold Cup will be a CHALLENGE EVENT.  This idea was the “brainchild” of Andy Tomlin and myself after last year’s Gold Cup in England at the awards banquet (after a few too many if I may say…).   A debate ensued  involving which country had the best One-Arm Deadlifters, one thing lead to another, and a challenge was made. We decided it could only be decided on the platform – thus this year’s Gold Cup Challenge of the TEAM TWO MAN ONE HAND DEADLIFT CHALLENGE.  

Another very nice addition to this year’s Gold Cup is the day trip to the see the Dinnie Stones the day following.  The Castlemilk Gym Club is making all the travel arrangements for this trip.  The cost is 15 pounds, which is to defray the expenses of renting a van and fuel.  So if you also want to get your chance at lifting the Dinnie Stones – this is your opportunity!! 

MEET DETAILS

Event: 2012 IAWA Gold Cup

Venue:  Castlemilk Community Centre, Glasgow, Scotland

Meet Promoters:  Matthew Finkle and Andy Tomlin

Date:  November 3rd, 2012

ENTRY FORM (word document): 2012 Gold Cup Entry Form

ENTRY FORM (pdf):  2012 Gold Cup Entry Form